Smartphone screen technology used to trick harmful bacteria


Conducting plastics found in smartphone screens can be used to trick the metabolism of pathogenic bacteria, report scientists. By adding or removing electrons from the plastic surface, bacteria may be tricked into growing more or less. The method may find widespread use in preventing bacterial infections in hospitals or improve effectiveness in wastewater management.

Blood test for colitis screening using infrared technology could reduce dependence on colonoscopy, study finds


A fast, simple blood test for ulcerative colitis using infrared spectroscopy could provide a cheaper, less invasive alternative for screening compared to colonoscopy, which is now the predominant test, according to a study.

Biofeedback technology helping improve balance in Parkinson's patients


Researchers are helping patients with Parkinson’s disease regain stable balance and confidence in performing daily activities in their own homes. A research team is developing the Smarter Balance System (SBS), a smartphone-based biofeedback rehabilitation system that guides patients through a series of balance exercises using wearable technology.

Glowing tumor technology helps surgeons remove hidden cancer cells


Surgeons were able to identify and remove a greater number of cancerous nodules from lung cancer patients when combining intraoperative molecular imaging (IMI) — through the use of a contrast agent that makes tumor cells glow during surgery — with preoperative positron emission tomograph y (PET) scans. This study shows how effective the combination of IMI with the tumor-glowing agent can be when combined with traditional PET imaging.

New technology to manipulate cells could help treat Parkinson's, arthritis, other diseases


A groundbreaking advancement in materials could potentially help patients requiring stem cell therapies for spinal cord injuries, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, arthritic joints or any other condition requiring tissue regeneration, according to a new study.