Interrupting Parkinson's disease


Scientists have identified a toxic cascade that leads to neuronal degeneration in patients with Parkinson’s disease and figured out how to interrupt it, reports a study. Intervening with an antioxidant early in the disease process may break the degenerative cycle and improve neuron function in Parkinson’s, the study showed. Parkinson’s is second most common neurodegenerative disorder.

Parkinson's severity assessed through drawing


Researchers asked volunteers to draw a spiral on a sheet of paper. By analyzing how long it took them to draw the spiral and how hard they pressed on the paper with the pen, the team could not only tell which volunteers had Parkinson’s disease, they could also tell how severe it was. Doctors could use the automated system in their surgery to easily diagnose the disease or keep track of the progress of existing patients.

Drugs targeting the beta2-adrenoreceptor linked to Parkinson's disease


Researchers want to prevent alpha-synuclein from accumulating in the brain. To do so, the team searched for drugs that turn down alpha-synuclein production. They then tested the drugs in mice and stem cells and studied in data from the health records of millions of people living in Norway. The results of their efforts, point to a new drug development path for PD.

Altered bacterial communities in the gut could be an indicator for Parkinson's disease


By the time Parkinson’s disease manifests as the typical motor dysfunctions, portions of the brain have already been irreversibly destroyed. In search of an early portent of the disease, researchers may now have found one in the gut: they have shown that the bacterial community in the gut of Parkinson’s patients differs from that of healthy people even at a very early stage of the disease.