Keychain detector could catch food allergens before it's too late


For kids and adults with food allergies, a restaurant outing can be a fraught experience. Even when care is taken, freshly prepared or packaged meals can accidentally become cross-contaminated with an offending food and trigger a reaction. Now researchers report the development of a new portable allergen-detection system — including a keychain analyzer — that could help prevent trips to the emergency room.

E. Jean Life Advice – Late Night Hook Up Advice

Dear E. Jean: What’s the club etiquette when an attractive guy moves in close and starts petting my hips 10 minutes after he introduces himself to me? I’m not a prude, but I’d like to at least know a guy before he feels me up! Should I tell him off? I’ve tried both ways: Recently when it happened, I told the guy, “Keep your hands to yourself!” and he lost interest. And when a second guy did it, I pretended his hands weren’t on me and he stayed interested. What should I do?

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

After-Hours Etiquette Girl

After-Hours, Girl: Piffle! You don’t go to clubs for the “etiquette.” You go to clubs to be playful. You go to clubs to be daring. You go to clubs to be indecorous in the dark.

Of course, if a dude starts plucking at you like you’re a viola, fie! fie! Give him a knee in the groin. But if you like a lad? And he shoots his arm about you and starts playing patty-cake on your posterior? Reach around, clasp his hand, smile into his eyes, pull his hand off, and—hold it. Entwine your fingers with his. This move is so disarming, it’s practically kinky.

But really now, come on. If a chap in a club doesn’t put his arm around you, nestle in to you rakishly like he’s leaning on a golf club, drop his voice, talk the most ridiculous nonsense, and run his hand up and down your back so expertly that you discover, when you stagger outside into the moonlight at 2:30 a.m., that you are no longer wearing a bra, then that chap is not—just a moment! Who says it’s always a chap? If you get a chance to kiss a soft, fragrant girl, do it. You may not get the opportunity again.

This letter is from the E. Jean archive.

New study reveals late spread of breast cancer and backs key role of early diagnosis


Breast cancer cells that spread to other parts of the body break off and leave the primary tumor at late stages of disease development, scientists have found. The results show that catching and treating breast cancer before it spreads is a realistic goal. It also opens the door to predicting which drugs will work against breast cancer that has already spread.

Antibiotics taken late in pregnancy can increase risk for inflammatory bowel diseases in offspring


When mice that are genetically susceptible to developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were given antibiotics during late pregnancy and the early nursing period, their offspring were more likely to develop an inflammatory condition of the colon that resembles human IBD, report scientists.

People who go to bed late have less control over OCD symptoms — ScienceDaily

A late bedtime is associated with lower perceived control of obsessive thoughts, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Binghamton University Professor of Psychology Meredith E. Coles and former graduate student Jessica Schubert (now at University of Michigan Medical School) monitored twenty individuals diagnosed with OCD and ten individuals endorsing subthreshold OCD symptoms during one week of sleep. Participants completed sleep diaries and daily ratings of perceived degree of control over obsessive thoughts and ritualized behaviors. The researchers found that previous night’s bedtime significantly predicted participants’ perceived ability to control their obsessive thoughts and compulsive behavior on the subsequent day.

“We’re really interested in how this kind of unusual timing of sleep might affect cognitive functioning,” said Schubert. “One possibility is impulse control. It might be that something about shifting the timing of your sleep might reduce your ability to control your thoughts and your behaviors, so it might make it more likely that you’re going to have a hard time dismissing intrusive thoughts characteristic of obsessions, and it might make it more difficult for you to refrain from compulsive behaviors that are designed to reduce the anxiety caused by obsessive thoughts.”

On average participants in the study went to bed around 12:30 at night. Patients who met criteria for delayed sleep phase disorder, about 40% of the sample, went to bed around 3 a.m.

“I always knew you were supposed to get eight hours of sleep, but I was never told it matters when you do it,” said Coles. “It’s been striking to me that this difference seems to be very specific to the circadian component of when you sleep. That we find that there are specific negative consequences of sleeping at the wrong times, that’s something to educate the public about.”

The researchers are interested in exploring this phenomenon further. Coles plans on collecting pilot data using lightboxes to shift people’s bedtimes. “It’s one of our first efforts to actually shift their bedtimes and see if it reduces their OCD symptoms, and if this improves their ability to resist those intrusive thoughts and not develop compulsions in response to them.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by Binghamton University. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.