Flat-chested and Can’t Afford Breast Implants

Dear E. Jean: I’ve always been flat-chested, but I had a great figure with a good butt and legs. After giving birth to our baby daughter, I breast-fed and my boobs looked amazing!

Now, a year later, I’m back to normal weight, and I have no boobs at all. My husband always said, “Don’t worry, you can have them augmented,” but with the costs of educating our child, feeding her, and finishing my grad degree, we’ll never be able to afford the procedure. I enjoy my life, but I can’t avoid feeling ugly and unfixable. I know physical beauty is not everything, but how can I stop feeling bad about my breasts? —New Mommy on the Block

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My Dear Miss Block: Breasts are like movie stars. Those who want to be noticed are ignored, and those who want to be left alone are harassed. Show your cute, taut, sylphlike shape. Make tight sweaters and T-shirts your style. In a world of plastic and saline, the streamlined siren rules.

In other words, if you change the way you see your breasts, your breasts will change.

P.S. Not a philosopher? Girl, I can fix your boobs for free. Ready? Snap on a Miracle Bra. Good. We’re done. Now forget your bust. I promise you everybody else has.

This letter is from the E. Jean archive.

3-D-printed implants can improve integration of amputee prosthetic devices with bone — ScienceDaily

A new study evaluated two additive manufacturing methods for producing either fine or coarse textured titanium implants and compared the strength of bone integration, interlocking, and torque in rats given one or both types of the implants in the distal femurs. The ability to apply this technology to customize implant surface textures and geometries to match the specific anatomy of human amputees is increasingly important as the trend in prosthetic devices moves toward transcutaneous osseointegrated implants rather than socket-cup fitting devices, according to an article published in 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

The article entitled “Osseointegration of Coarse and Fine Textured Implants Manufactured by Electron Beam Melting and Direct Metal Laser Sintering” is coauthored by David Ruppert, Ola Harrysson, PhD, Denis Marcellin-Little, DEDV, Sam Abumoussa, Laurence Dahners, MD, and Paul Weinhold, PhD, University of North Carolina (UNC), UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill; North Carolina State University (NCSU) and NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh.

Electron beam melting produces a coarse textured implant, whereas direct metal laser sintering can create either a fine or coarse textured surface. The researchers reported substantial differences between the two fine and coarse implants based on mechanical testing to assess osseointegration and torsional properties, and measures of bone volume fraction and bone-implant contact.

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Materials provided by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.