Immune cells may heal bleeding brain after strokes


By studying rodents, researchers showed that instead of attacking germs, some neutrophils may help heal the brain after an intracerebral hemorrhage, a form of stroke caused by ruptured blood vessels. The study suggests that two neutrophil-related proteins may play critical roles in protecting the brain from stroke-induced damage and could be used as treatments for intracerebral hemorrhage.

Cell model of the brain provides new knowledge on developmental disease


By reprogramming skin cells into nerve cells, researchers are creating cell models of the human brain. In a new study, the researchers describe how cells from patients with the severe developmental disease lissencephaly differ from healthy cells. The method can provide vital new knowledge on difficult-to-study congenital diseases.

The brain at work: Spotting half-hidden objects


The human and non-human primate brain is remarkable in recognizing partially hidden objects. A study, conducted during a shape recognition task, shows as more of the shape is hidden, a brain area involved in cognition starts to sends signals to the visual cortex. The findings make the scientists wonder if this communication between different brain areas might be impaired in people with autism or Alzheimer’s. Both conditions can cause confusion in cluttered surroundings and problems recognizing objects.

Thirdhand smoke exposure effects on liver and brain found to worsen over time


Thirdhand-smoke results when exhaled smoke and smoke emanating from the tip of burning cigarettes gets on surfaces such as clothing, hair, homes, and cars. Using a mouse model, researchers have found that thirdhand-smoke exposure has a significant effect on health, specifically the liver and brain, as early as one month after initiation of exposure — an effect that worsens with time.

Young binge drinkers show altered brain activity


Researchers have studied the brain activity of young binge-drinking college students in Spain, and found distinctive changes in brain activity, which may indicate delayed brain development and be an early sign of brain damage. The results suggest that bingeing has tangible effects on the young brain, comparable with some of those seen in chronic alcoholics.